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Update: Police Shoot, Kill Suspected Burglar

Authorities say a man suspected of burglarizing a Redondo Beach home died after he and Long Beach police exchanged gunfire.

A man suspected of stealing a white BMW during a burglary at a Redondo Beach home was killed by Long Beach police Thursday morning after firing at officers at the end of a vehicle chase, authorities said.

The burglary, which occurred in the 1600 block of Morgan Lane in North Redondo Beach, was reported shortly after midnight on Thursday, according to Sgt. Shawn Freeman of the Redondo Beach Police Department. The theft was discovered when the residents came home and found the car missing. The keys were stolen from inside the house.

California Highway Patrol officers chased the suspect from Redondo Beach into Long Beach shortly before 1 a.m. but lost sight of him as he exited the southbound 405 (San Diego) Freeway at Studebaker Road, Long Beach police spokeswoman Marlene Arrona said.

Minutes later, Long Beach police spotted the vehicle and gave chase, she said.

The suspect crashed into a garage in the 6400 block of Keynote Street near Hackett Avenue and was killed in an officer-involved shooting after he brandished a gun and fired on police, Arrona said.

The suspect, who Long Beach police Sgt. Dave Marander described as a
young man, was pronounced dead at the scene. No officers were injured, Marander said.

Redondo Beach police are still investigating the burglary.

—Editor Nicole Mooradian contributed to this report.

Mike Ruehle February 23, 2013 at 12:28 AM
Don't forget about the other Long Beach cop also CONVICTED of rape last year. Two in one year..........that we know of. Tough job being a rapist. http://belmontshore.patch.com/articles/lbpd-officer-charged-with-sex-crimes-has-left-job
John B. Greet February 23, 2013 at 02:35 AM
Yet Ruehle conveniently forgets about the thousands of current and former LBPD officers over the entire duration of LBPD's existence that have never been charged with or convicted of any crime of any sort. Ruehle only recognizes the comparatively few criminals who once worked for LBPD...never the thousands of professionals who once worked there and the hundreds who still do. Pathetic.
Mike Ruehle February 23, 2013 at 10:03 PM
It turns out 8 officers fired without warning upon a 71 year old woman and her daughter delivering newspapers because cops SUSPECTED they were Dorner. 102 bullet holes were counted in the women's pickup truck, 7 in a nearby tree and dozens in the homes surrounding the incident. Too bad you guys don't know how to google. http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/02/22/17058326-8-lapd-officers-involved-in-shooting-after-dorner-case-of-mistaken-identity
Shore Resident February 24, 2013 at 03:51 AM
Nor do you Mr. Ruehle as I have still not seen an apology from you from you to Mr. Thomas' family for asserting that I was Don Thomas after I posted Mr. Thomas' obituary for you. So, when you assail Mr. Greet's credibility, perhaps you should take the foil off your head and look in the mirror. Signed, Not Don Thomas
John B. Greet February 24, 2013 at 05:24 AM
Once again, Ruehle seems disinterested in waiting for verified facts before spewing his venom against law enforcement. Ruehle has now changed his story, no doubt hoping no one would notice. First it was: "...officers fired *104+ shots* into an unsuspected vehicle carrying two women" then it became: "*102 bullet holes* were counted in the women's pickup truck." (emphases added) It never seems to occur to Ruehle to question the source of his revised number (the victim's attorney - no potential conflict of interest there, right?). It never even occurs to Ruehle that at least some of the holes in the truck (and perhaps as many as half of them) may well be *exit* holes that have a corresponding entrance hole. If so, this would of course prove Ruehle's initial statement that "...officers fired 104+ shots into an unsuspected vehicle..." entirely false. If half of the holes were made upon exit, then (assuming the victim's attorney counted correctly) 8 officers hit the truck with a total of 51 bullets (or 6.4 rounds per officer), not 104+ or 102. But Ruehle isn't interested in letting a little thing like independently verified facts get in the way of his own knee-jerk condemnations. He's far too busy "Googling" to bother actually trying to understand what he reads. The Torrance mistaken-identity shootings are still under investigation. If any of the officers are found to have committed misconduct, they should be swiftly and severely punished.
Ms Davis February 27, 2013 at 08:30 PM
I have a real problem with police officers killing an innocent young man of mistaken identity. I known this young man ever since he was born and i no in my heart that he would of never done anything of the such that you all are accusing him of. He is from a middle class family and he does not need to steal anything.
John B. Greet February 27, 2013 at 09:03 PM
Ms. Davis, with all due consideration for what you know "in your heart", the factual evidence seems to indicate otherwise. As a parent, I can honestly say that I also always felt certain "in my heart" that some of my own childrens' friends would have never done anything even remotely illegal...and I was always *very* surprised to learn how wrong my heart could sometimes prove.
Mike Ruehle March 05, 2013 at 08:25 AM
Two questions for John B. Greet, who was a long beach police officer when court cases McSherry v. City of Long Beach and Venegas v. Roberson were taking place: 1. How did LBPD justify continued employment until 2010 of officers Turley and Roberson who were found in these court cases to have lied, fabricated evidence and coerced witnesses? 2. For someone claiming to be the greatest critic of police misconduct, where was your voice during and after the outcome of these court cases in 2009?
John B. Greet March 05, 2013 at 08:42 AM
Why in the world should I entertain Ruehle's questions when he repeatedly ignores my challenges to provide objectively verifiable proof for the many baseless claims he has made here and on other comment threads? Why in the world should I entertain Ruehle's questions when he intentionally misrepresents the contents of a report that he, himself, has cited even after I have advised him of his errors? Let Ruehle provide the objectively verifiable proof I requested several times and let him state for the record that he (intentionally or in ignorance) misrepresented the contents of the CATO report he cited. When Ruehle has done those things, then let Ruehle provide a link to the transcripts of the court cases he has cited and let him quote from those documents the specific lines in which the courts took judicial notice that officers Turley and Roberson "lied, fabricated evidence and coerced witnesses" Once Ruehle has proven *those* statements to be true then perhaps I will entertain his questions.
Mike Ruehle March 05, 2013 at 09:56 AM
McSherry v. City of Long Beach, case number: 06-55837 in 2009 determined Long Beach Police Officers Norman Turley and Sergeant Carthel Roberson falsified and fabricated evidence in a rape case leading to a wrongful conviction of Leonard McSherry. After 14-years in prison, McSherry was exonerated by DNA evidence and a confession by the true perpetrator. Long Beach taxpayers paid to settle Mr. McSherry subsequent law suit. Both officers continued to work as Long Beach Police Officers. http://www.metnews.com/articles/2009/mcsh033109.htm The same Long Beach police officer Carthel Roberson had previously been found to have falsified evidence in Venegas v. Roberson, case number No. 81-5696. Roberson and three fellow officers lied during a murder trial and coerced trial witnesses into giving false evidence against Venegas, resulting in him being imprisoned for 3-years. Officer Roberson was later PROMOTED to LBPD Sergeant. http://ftp.resource.org/courts.gov/c/F2/704/704.F2d.1144.81-5696.html
John B. Greet March 05, 2013 at 06:59 PM
"Let Ruehle provide the objectively verifiable proof I requested several times and let him state for the record that he (intentionally or in ignorance) misrepresented the contents of the CATO report he cited. When Ruehle has done those things, then let Ruehle provide a link to the transcripts of the court cases he has cited and let him quote from those documents the specific lines in which the courts took judicial notice that officers Turley and Roberson 'lied, fabricated evidence and coerced witnesses'" Ruehle *really* needs to work on his reading comprehension.
Barbara Hill March 17, 2013 at 08:57 PM
Ms. Davis I agree with you 100%. They didn't know Chris like we did and I feel as though they didn't give him a chance to prove his innocence. This was a brilliant young man whose life was just beginning and the ones that were suppose to protect us took his away. I am very angry and hurt right now, but I am a firm believer in God and he's gonna take care of everything. R.I.P Chris and you will be saldy missed
John B. Greet March 17, 2013 at 09:01 PM
"...after firing at officers at the end of a vehicle chase..."
Barbara Hill March 17, 2013 at 09:10 PM
I thinks its LAPD. And if you knew Chris like I did you wouldn't be saying that they did a good job. And from my understanding LAPD don't a good reputation. Its just sad but their another judge that they have to answer. God Bless You All.
Mike Ruehle March 18, 2013 at 09:05 AM
Again, two questions for John B. Greet, who was a long beach police officer when above court cases McSherry v. City of Long Beach and Venegas v. Roberson were taking place: 1. How did LBPD justify continued employment until 2010 of officers Turley and Roberson who were found in these court cases to have lied, fabricated evidence and coerced witnesses? 2. For someone claiming to be the greatest critic of police misconduct, where was your voice during and after the outcome of these court cases in 2009?
Donna Burns March 18, 2013 at 03:01 PM
Yet Ruehle conveniently forgets about the thousands of current and former LBPD officers over the entire duration of LBPD's existence that have never been charged with or convicted of any crime of any sort. Some officers that were guilty were never charged for their crimes, and really there is no comparing cops who were never charged/convicted with cops who should have been. Or with cops who have honest clean records, that doesn't make up for the bad cops and their crimes so why compare ??? This is a "REAL" problem and it needs to be addressed, that's why there is so much anger on this site and in the community. I hope to God the day never comes for you Mr. Greet, but if this happened to someone you loved then you might understand what others have gone through. It is ridiculous to believe that just because certain cops were never charged or convicted that they aren't guilty.
Mike Ruehle March 18, 2013 at 03:23 PM
Cops commit more crimes than the General Public. According to the Cato Institute (figure 10 in below link), the per capita frequency rate for cops raping someone is 3 times greater than the per capita frequency rate of the general public. The rates for murder and assault are also higher. http://www.policemisconduct.net/statistics/2010-annual-report/#_Geographic_Distribution They further state, "While the rate of police officers officially charged with murder is only 1.06% higher than the current general population murder rate, if excessive force complaints involving fatalities were prosecuted as murder the murder rate for law enforcement officers would exceed the general population murder rate by 472%."
John B. Greet March 22, 2013 at 01:16 PM
Ms. Burns, it is neither reasonable nor just to consider any person guilty of a crime without their first having been charged, prosecuted and *convicted*. Ruehle's CATO study compares cops who have only been *accused*, with a civiliain population of people who have been *convicted*. I trust you can appreciate the difference because Ruehle seems quite unable to. CATO reports that the average conviction and incarceration rates for cops are less than those of the general public but offers no suggestions as to *why* that might be. Is pandemic corruption and favoritism in the justice system one possible explanation? Sure- and Ruehle seems to anxiously leap to this conclusion- but CATO does not offer any proof to *support* that conclusion. All CATO does is report some numbers, make some inapt comparisons, and then leave the reader to draw his or her own conclusions. I have never once said that "just because certain cops were never charged or convicted that they aren't guilty". I have only said that people should not assume cops (or any other grouping of people) are guilty of any crime unless they have, in fact, been convicted. Again, the CATO study addresses civilian population *conviction* rates but police population *accusation* rates. This is not a fair comparison. Ruehle routinely paints all of law enforcement or all of LBPD with the same broad brush of condemnation that only a comparative few have actually earned.
Mike Ruehle March 22, 2013 at 06:03 PM
Police shot another person today, twice. Police are meeting to determine what to tell the public about where it took place and what made the officers fire their weapon. http://www.lbpost.com/news/2000001994-felony-robbery-suspect-wounded-in-officer-involved-shooting
Linus Harp March 22, 2013 at 06:37 PM
I agree with Mr. Ruehle. Police officers should give at least 3 verbal warnings before deploying any use of force upon any armed suspect. Talking calmly to alleged criminals will reduce the number of unprovoked police attacks.
S.A.P. March 22, 2013 at 07:33 PM
Perhaps, Linus, you can suggest that to the law enforcement officers if you are ever held at gunpoint. That way, when you are lying on the ground, dead, they can use the old "...but we only gave him 2 verbal warnings, so we didn't shoot" excuse.
John B. Greet March 22, 2013 at 07:52 PM
Mr. Harp, have you ever held any sort of law enforcement position or do you personally know anyone who has or does? Are you aware that law enforcement's role in most use of force encounters is primarily that of reacting to the actions of others? Are you aware that police officers routinely have split seconds to make decisions that others then have the luxury of dissecting for weeks, months, and years thereafter? Are you aware that the vast majority of law enforcers never fire their weapons except during qualifications and practice at the range? Are you aware that each year in the U.S., on average, criminals feloniously kill a police officer once every five days and that criminals assault 150 officers each *day* just for trying to do their jobs?
Tim Sole March 22, 2013 at 08:31 PM
John, in the good old days, I actually knew the officers that patrolled the area I lived in. The where fair when needed, stern when needed and down right mean if required. Things they didn't do that would be usefully in today's society. They weren't out to create revenue, they weren't out to run checkpoints, basically they where the local cops. They actually knew the difference between good guys and bad guys and would give you break when you where down or kick your butt if needed. Today, police don't have that option, create revenue, arrest everyone they can, not because they want to, because thats what the politicians have decreed. Now people just hate the police, for no other reason, than we have lost common sense in this country, when it comes to how police are allowed to relate to the public.
John B. Greet March 22, 2013 at 10:13 PM
Tim, in the old days, the population was far less dense and crime rates were far lower. Calls for service were far less numerous, beats were smaller, and officers had more time to get out of their cars and walk parts of their beats from time to time. In the old days, Long Beach cops could far better afford to buy a home in the city in which they devoted so much of their time and for which they risked so much. Unfortunately, police wages have not kept pace with the overall cost of housing in Long Beach and this, in turn, has driven officers who desire to own, rather than rent, to other communities -and, in some cases, even other counties- where home ownership is more easily achieved. In the old days, officers were allowed more discretion and were not sent on calls that did not require law enforcement attention. Today the number of policies, procedures, and laws the typical officer must understand, follow, and competently apply are staggering and an ever more demanding citizenry requires their presence at everything from a broken tree branch to a child who wont go to school. The officers themselves have no control over policy decisions. Like cops everywhere else, they do they best they can with the funds and the tools the electeds and highly-appointeds make available to them while still trying to go home to their families in one piece at the end of their shifts. The good old days, Tim? Long ago and far, far away...
Mary Chase April 10, 2013 at 05:26 PM
LBPD have earned their "trigger happy" reputation. Anyone having lived in this city as long as I have (and never been arrested or been the subject of any LBPD investigation) has seen their share of LBPD's methods.
John B. Greet April 10, 2013 at 07:55 PM
"LBPD have earned their "trigger happy" reputation." Interesting. On what basis, other than your anecdotal personal perceptions, do you make this claim? What studies have you conducted and/or reviewed? Have you any idea how many times LBPD officers have used less than lethal force (or no physical force at all) when lethal force would have been authorized? Have you compared that figure to the number of uses of lethal force and determined some sort of verifiable ratio between the two and which then supports your claim to any degree? Or, as I suspect is most likely the case, are your personal anecdotal perceptions based solely upon various news stories you have become aware of over the years. Stories which tend only to be printed about the small minority of incidents during which LBPD actually deploys deadly force, rather than the vast majority of incidents when it does not?
Donna Burns April 11, 2013 at 01:14 AM
No one here (at least not me) are condemning cops in general...but, the ones who aren't so law enforcing/law abiding are the topic, and deserve to be !
John B. Greet April 11, 2013 at 05:32 AM
"...the ones who aren't so law enforcing/law abiding are the topic, and deserve to be!" The topic, here, *was* the Redondo Beach burglar and car thief that CHP and LBPD chased and who LBPD shot and killed after he fired upon them at the end of the pursuit. *That* was the topic until Ruehle and others decided to inject other incidents by other police departments into the discussion. All police misconduct is wrong and should be fully investigated and, where proven, punished to the fullest extent the law allows. I have never once said otherwise.
Mary Chase May 09, 2013 at 10:13 PM
I base this on personal witnessing of 2 completely unrelated incidents that did not involve me or anyone I know, but I was a witness to what was done by the LBPD and the other person. It doesn't matter to me the statistics of LBPD not using lethal force unnecessarily. What matters more is when they DO use lethal force on unarmed persons, then proceed to intimidate all witnesses by threatening them with arrest if they don't leave the area. People who have a right to be walking on the sidewalk and not interfering. Yes, I've seen it and experienced it. Make excuses for them now.
John B. Greet May 11, 2013 at 04:04 AM
So based only upon your anecdotal personal perceptions. Thanks. I never attempt to make excuses for actual police officer misconduct. There is no excuse for it and I am among the strongest critics of actual police misconduct that you are ever likely to find. Still, two incidents of personal observation seem insufficient for the sweeping condemnation you offered here. Do you have any idea how many documented law-enforcement activities LBPD engages in every 24-hour period? Thousands. Between calls for service and self-initiated activities, LBPD officers are some of the busiest cops among comparably-sized cities. The average LBPD officer handles hundreds of law enforcement-related calls during his or her shift. Even one instance of police officer misconduct is one too many, but when compared to the amount of non misconduct-related activity in Long Beach, the instances of proven misconduct can be measured in hundredths of a percentage point.

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